Food Insurance Essentials Kit Review

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We’ve all heard of the rumors started by doomsdayers about the Mayan apocalypse that’s supposed to come on December 21, 2012. I know what you’re thinking: they have been wrong so many times before, so why should they be right now? Personally, I highly doubt the whole Mayan apocalypse nonsense; I think it’s a bunch of brainless and baseless babble. However, what I can’t deny is that the world seems to be experiencing quite an increase of both natural and man-made disasters.

Whether it’s tsunamis in Asia, hurricanes in America, economic depression in Europe, the threat of war in the Middle East, or the melting of the ice caps in the Poles, one thing’s for certain: something’s definitely wrong with the world as we know it. As such, it isn’t really surprising if you’re worried about you and your family’s safety. In fact, I’d be more shocked if you weren’t concerned at all about all that’s going on around us.

Don’t get me wrong, though. I’m not saying that the world is coming to an end, but I’d rather have a plan and not need it, than need a plan and not have it. If you feel the same as I do, here are a few things I think you should consider doing:

  1. First off, always have an emergency bug-out plan (no, it has nothing to do with bugs). When I say bug-out, I mean escape plan. When worse comes to worst, the best thing to do is to keep a level head to be able to make logical decisions. Having a plan for the worst is a good way to keep your calm and prepare yourself mentally for whatever might happen. If you’re taking care of some people, then it might also be a good idea to set an emergency rendezvous point where you can meet up and escape together.
  2. Secondly, make sure you have an emergency supply of all your essentials. Bring along some food, water, medical supplies, hygiene products, personal safety gear, and maintenance tools. Iff you plan on building your own emergency food supply, be sure to consider buying freeze-dried food for survival. Check out these Food Insurance reviews for more information.
  3. Lastly, teach yourself some survival skills. While it is admirable to take an intensive training workshop, knowing how to apply first aid, bandages, and CPR will do for starters. If you want to go a step beyond the basics, try getting some wilderness survival training from your local campers or outdoorsmen.

The Bug Out Bag – For When The SHTF

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Hurricane Katrina LootingWe live in turbulent times. Natural disasters seem to be occurring with more frequency and higher devastation. Civil unrest in countries across the world is rising. Have you ever wondered what would happen to you and your family should you be forced to evacuate your home because of an impending natural disaster? Are you ready to brave the wild if a disaster situation happens and you need to get out of your home and leave the area in a hurry? What survival capabilities do you want at the ready if such a scenario were to unfold? These are some questions that every survival minded person should ask themselves right now. To gain the survival advantage, you need to have a survival system ready to go should you and your family be forced to evacuate.

The Bug Out Bag

Bug Out Bag GearEnter the survival bug out bag. This item can be referred to as a ‘go bag’ or survival kit, 72 hour kit, or SHTF bag. If you haven’t heard SHTF before, it is an acronym for a time when it ‘hits the fan.’ A bug out bag is designed to support your survival away from your home for however long you deem necessary. 72 hour kits are designed and supplied to keep you kicking for, you guessed it, three days. If you feel like you need a week of survival capabilities, then supply it accordingly. However you look at it, this bag should be ready at all times. If a disaster strikes, you probably won’t have time to gather gear and supplies. You will need to act fast; the survival of you and your family and loved ones depends on this.

Remember the rule of 3s. You can survive:

  • 3 minutes without air
  • 3 hours without warmth or shelter
  • 3 days without water
  • 3 weeks without food

Your survival kit needs to address these needs at a bare minimum. Other items can be added for additional comfort and safety. Typical bug out bag contents will have items that can be broken down into these categories:

  • food and water
  • personal protection
  • camping and shelter
  • signal and communication
  • first aid

Use this bug out bag checklist below to make sure you build your kit with the right gear.

Food and Water

SteriPEN Adventurer Opti Handheld UV Water PurifierFood and water are the most important priorities of your bug out bag contents. You won’t last long in a disaster situation without these two items. I like MREs and Mountain House freeze-dried entrees the best. They have a long shelf life and provide a lot of valuable calories. Granola, energy, and candy bars are good supplementary items as well. I like to carry at least one liter of water, and supplement this with a water filter. Katadyn filters are a great option. MSR also makes some great filters, although they tend to be a little bit more expensive. The SteriPEN is a fantastic item; it is small, light and effective. It is battery operated and isn’t actually a ‘filter’, but the SteriPEN is what I include in my personal bug out bag.

MRE (Meals, Ready to Eat) Premium case of 12 Fresh MREs with Heaters. 5 Year Shelf Life.

Protection

H&K P2000 SK 9mm.During a disaster, safety will be a major concern for you and your family. The rule of law will most likely disintegrate. High amounts of stress can cause peaceful people to act violently. The ability to protect yourself and loved ones becomes a high priority. If you live in a state where concealed carry is allowed, you should get your permit, train with and start carrying a self-defense firearm. This will save space in your pack since you already have the firearm and spare magazines on your person. If you live where concealed carry is not allowed or you don’t have a permit, consider adding a small handgun to your bag. Train with it frequently so you know how to safely use it, but keep it with your bug out bag at all times. Don’t forget to add extra ammunition, but don’t over do it. Ammo is heavy, and taking more ammo might limit your ability to carry more water or food. My concealed-carry firearm of choice is an H&K P2000 sub compact in 9mm. I carry it on a ankle holster with two spare magazines. In my bug out bag, I added 1 box of 50 rounds of 9mm hollow points.

Cold Recon Scout Black Kraton Handle With Secure Ex Sheath SK-5 High Carbon SteelA solid survival knife is also a must to include. Since I carry a Benchmade tactical folder on my person at all times (along with my gun), I also include a Cold Steel Scout Recon fixed blade inside my bug out bag. This is not only a protection item, but can be used for bushcraft activities and is one of the most useful tools to have when in a survival situation. For a less lethal option, consider adding a small pepper spray canister or taser. These items are fantastic for getting away from hostile groups. Don’t overlook this category! You could have enough gear to last you a year, but if someone takes it by force, your preparations were in vain.

Camping and Survival

Emergency Zone Brand HeatStore Reflective Survival TentThe ideal situation during an emergency would be to remain in your home. Your home is stocked with all the things you and your family need to survive. If circumstances forced you to leave, however, you would need an alternate form of shelter. Tents are great options, but they are bulky. Even backpacking tents are heavy and cumbersome. More than likely, you will need to find or create some kind of temporary shelter. Emergency tents and sleeping bags work well and are lightweight and portable. If you opt to take along a family tent, it is a good idea to split the weight up throughout your family. We’ll talk more about family member bug out bags later.

Petzl Tikka Improved Lumen Output Xp 2 Headlamp, Black, One SizeAlong with shelter, you will want to include items to increase your survival chances. Fishing and trapping gear allow added food gathering options. Fire starting materials, such as lighters, matches, and striker based fire starters are a definite necessity. If your bag has room, a small camp stove is a nice addition, but isn’t necessary. A good flashlight is a must as well. Consider adding a headlamp; these handy tools allow you to work hands free.

Rain gear, extra tarps, extra blankets, extra clothes, work gloves, and duct tape are some other items to include, as space allows.

Communication

Motorola MT352TPR Giant FRS Weatherproof Two-Way - 35 Mile Radio Triple Pack - SilverIn a disaster situation, communication with your party will be essential for security as well as logistics. Cell phones will most likely be offline. However, two way radios work great in these situations. Remember to pack extra batteries for items that require them. A survival radio is also a good item to have. When the emergency is over, your radio will let you know when it is safe to return home. Signal mirrors, whistles and flares could augment your signaling capabilities.

Etón FR160B Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Black)Remember to adhere to proper OPSEC during a disaster situation. Operation security is paramount to your safety and the safety of those within your group. Improper light discipline, not communicating with coded messages, and improper use of signal devices could give away your position, intentions, group size, supplies, etc to other people that might want to take what you have. There are some great articles on Graywolf survival website that go over the many facets of OPSEC. Head over there now to learn more, but don’t forget to come back and read the rest on preparing your bug out bag here!

First Aid

Coleman Expedition First Aid KitMore than likely, first aid skills and supplies will be necessary from the get go. A good bug out bag is always going to have as many first aid options as can be packed. Don’t overlook this category! Even just some antibacterial pads, band-aides, and tylenol can go a long way to improve a survival situation.

Remember to consider your family member’s prescription needs. It is a good idea to buy a first aid kit, and then add more stuff to it, like medications, extra band aids, scissors, nitrile gloves, and gauze. Add what you think you and your family will need.

What To Pack Your Gear In

High Sierra Swerve Pack (Navy/Charcoal/Black)The bag or pack that you use and what you pack it with is completely customizable and ultimately up to you. A larger backpack will allow you to carry more gear, but this in turn will reduce your mobility and speed. If you plan on staying in a group, you will have expanded options. If you are able to employ a vehicle, many more capabilities will be possible. I have a survival duffle bag in my truck at all times. This constitutes my ‘vehicle bug out bag,’ and is a supplement to my bug out bag in the event that I will have my truck with me.

Some people like to use military style backpacks to create their bug out bags. The nice thing about these bags is they are built well and are very durable. The problem is that you will be attracting unwanted attention to yourself carrying around a multi-cam or dessert digital backpack, like the Falcon II from Maxpedition (awesome backpack!!). Remember those articles you just read about OPSEC? Instead, go with a neutral color, or even a color that is common for most school backpacks (blue, black, green).

Your bug out bag contents could go in any bag that you want them to. You could fit them all in a small fanny pack, or in a rolling duffle bag. It is completely up to you. Remember that you will have to make trade offs between more gear and more mobility. When packing my kits, I find that having a bug out bag checklist to track bug out bag essentials is a good way to get organized.

Family Bug Out Bags

Family Bug Out BagsIf you are single or plan on bugging out alone, for whatever reason, the kit you prepare should cater to your needs. If you have a family or you plan on bugging out in a group, the survival bug out bag you prepare needs to cater to the needs of your family or group. For example, let’s say you are a typical family of four: you, your spouse, and two kids (a son and daughter). Do you think that you will be able to carry all the survival essentials to keep your family of four alive for a week? Probably not.

Each member of your family needs to have their own bug out bag, customized to meet their individual needs. Let’s look at what the two parents could pack in their bags first, then look at what the kids could feasibly carry to help out.

Adult 1

  • 5 day supply of MREs
  • 2 Liters of Water
  • SteriPen adventurer water purifier
  • tent body
  • fire starter
  • emergency sleeping bag
  • poncho
  • spare socks, undergarments, sweater, and pants
  • two-way radio, spare batteries
  • hand crank radio
  • first aid kit (with medications specific for Adult 1)
  • fishing kit
  • personal mess kit
  • survival knife
  • 50 feet of paracord
  • extra ammo for concealed carry firearm
  • headlamp, spare batteries
  • personal documents and small amount of cash

Adult 2

  • 5 day supply of MREs
  • 2 Liters of Water
  • Katadyn water filter
  • tent poles
  • fire starter
  • emergency sleeping bag
  • poncho
  • spare socks, undergarments, sweater, and pants
  • two-way radio, spare batteries
  • hand crank radio
  • first aid kit (with medications specific for Adult 2)
  • snare kit
  • personal mess kit
  • survival hatchet
  • duct tape
  • small self defense firearm + 50 rounds of ammunition
  • headlamp, spare batteries
  • personal documents and small amount of cash

Notice that each adult is carrying a redundant supply of food and water, water filtration, and other survival items. Adult 1 is carrying a large portion of the family tent, and adult 2 is carrying another large part. There are a few differences in their gear items, but remember that redundancy is always good, especially since things tend to break and fail during a disaster situation.

Son

  • 3 day supply of MREs
  • 1 Liter of Water
  • aquamira emergency straw filter
  • tent rain fly
  • fire starter
  • emergency sleeping bag
  • poncho
  • spare socks, undergarments, sweater, and pants
  • two-way radio, spare batteries
  • small first aid kit (with medications specific for Son)
  • fishing kit
  • personal mess kit
  • multi tool
  • headlamp, spare batteries
  • personal documents and small amount of cash

Daughter

  • 3 day supply of MREs
  • 1 Liter of Water
  • aquamira emergency straw filter
  • tent stakes
  • fire starter
  • emergency sleeping bag
  • poncho
  • spare socks, undergarments, sweater, and pants
  • two-way radio, spare batteries
  • small first aid kit (with medications specific for Daughter)
  • snare kit
  • personal mess kit
  • small pocket knife
  • headlamp, spare batteries
  • personal documents and small amount of cash

Notice that the two kids are also helping carry the family tent, but the smaller parts. They are also carrying a smaller amount of food and water, a smaller water filter, and smaller first aid kits designed specifically for them.

Why all the redundancy? Well, we already talked about the fact that things tend to break or fail when you need them the most. But what would happen if you got split up from a member of your family or group? Having one person carry all the food, while another person carries all the first aid is a disaster waiting to happen. Every member of your family needs to have a bug out bag so that each member can survive if they end up being alone. This is not ideal, and you will want to remain together if at all possible. But designing your kits to meet each member’s specific needs is essential for everyone’s survival, especially if the group falls apart.

The Bottom Line

Options. It’s all about having options. For example, survival may or may not depend on your bringing a survival knife, but the options this item gives you are endless. Plan your bug out bag based on capabilities you want during a disaster. And for heavens sakes, set it up NOW and have it ready for when disaster strikes.

Here are a few articles that offer more insight into the important items to include in your survival bug out bag.

Duffle Bag – Survival Readiness

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As part of my bug out bag preparations, I have a large duffle bag at the ready. Within this survival duffle bag, I have an expanded survival kit which is meant to supplement my bug out bag if the situation allows for me to take it along in my vehicle. While my bug out bag has enough supplies for me to last about a week away from home, this large, canvas duffle bag has the possibility of sustaining me for another one to two weeks with a more diverse amount of survival gear. Lets take a look at what my survival duffle holds:

Camo Military Field Gear Duffle Bag Backpack

Leapers UTG Ranger Field Bag (Army Digital) – Amazon $40 (click here or picture above)

  • 15 MRE entrees (Buy here)
  • 8 3600 Calorie Datrex high energy food bars (Buy here)
  • 20 assorted powerbar gels (Buy here)
  • Katadyn Hiker Pro water filter (Buy here)
  • 4 Liters water (Buy nalgene bottles here)
  • Ka-Bar survival knife (Buy here)
  • Expanded first-aid kit (Buy here)
  • 3 each of: Under Armor calf length socks, underwear, base layer shirts and pants (Buy Socks here)
  • Olive drab wool sweater and beanie cap (Buy here)
  • leather gloves (Buy here)
  • fishing kit (Buy here)
  • snare kit
  • firestarting kit
  • Kel-Tec SU-22 folding rifle, with 2000 rounds of CCI mini mags, 500 rounds CCI shotshell #12 shot
  • Bushnell Binoculars (buy here)
  • 100 rounds 9mm Hollowpoints

This survival duffle is still a work in progress, and I need to tweak the gear involved. However, this bag has greatly expanded options from my bug out bag. The bag itself is a beast. It is absolutely huge. Go to amazon.com now and buy one or five. Similar bags from Blackhawk or 5.11 could cost you upwards of $200. The duffle bag is waterproof, fully padded, has multiple pockets and the carry straps are reinforced. It is also nicely done in Army Digital camo, with other color options available as well. The only thing lacking on this bag is the addition of some wheels to haul around all the gear that can be loaded into it!

This is just an example of what your ready to go vehicle survival duffle bag could be. You could similarly use a canvas duffle bag, or you could use a wheeled duffle bag if you anticipate carrying heavy guns and ammo. Rolling duffle bags are nice, but I think that survival bags should be a little lighter than those requiring wheels. This is especially true if you don’t have access to a vehicle in your survival situation. However you see it, supplement your bug out bag with a good survival duffle bag.

Food Storage Boxes

To gain any kind of survival advantage, the savvy prepper must consider items essential to life.  Humans cannot live long without food and water, which makes these the two most important survival items.  But what are some ways to store both food and water?

Water storage can be done many ways.  Empty soda bottles that have been washed out are great for storing water.  Larger containers such as blue food-grade 55 gallon barrels or other plastic storage bins that can be easily emptied or filled are great long-term storage options.  For on the go water storage or for ease in rationing, smaller bottled water containers bought in bulk work well.  They can easily supplement any go bag or bug out bag.

Food storage can be done many different ways as well.  5 gallon food-grade buckets can be lined with mylar bags and filled with wheat, rice, oats, legumes, and other dehydrated foods.  If stored in cool areas, like basements and cellars, the enclosed food can remain preserved for 30+ years.  Buckets are easily stackable, but not very portable.  Another food storage option is by packing food into #10 cans.  They also can last 30+ years, and are easily stackable, and are more portable than 5 gallon buckets.  Dehydrated and freeze-dried food is usually found stored in #10 cans.  Stocking up on canned goods at your local supermarket are another food storage option, and can either be stored in automatic can rotators, or in rubbermaid storage bins or other plastic storage boxes.  Canned food has a much shorter shelf life, usually between 6 and 18 months.  Check dates carefully and rotate often.

Military rations are another viable food storage item.  MRE’s, or meals ready to eat, don’t require water or heat to be eaten.  They are very portable and have varied shelf lives, usually between 5-10 years if stored in cool areas.  Many commercially available MREs can be bought in bulk, and come in cardboard storage boxes, which are easy to stack and transport.  If you get excessively large storage boxes, whether they be cardboard or wooden storage boxes, they will be more difficult to store and move.

Food and water storage is essential for the survival minded prepper, and can add great advantage during an emergency.

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